Blind woman can see with a bionic eye implant: A Grandmother of 88 becomes the first to be treated by this ground-breaking procedure

  • A dry, age-related macular disease meant that grandmother went blind in one eye because she was not able to see well enough.
  • The 88-year-old had a bionic implant fitted at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London
  • She is the first patient in the country to benefit from the implant to help her see










A revolutionary bionic implant has enabled an 88-year old grandmother to detect signals in her blind eyes.

After normal vision for a long time, she lost her sight in one of her eyes to dry age-related macular disease (AMD).

She was the first to receive the “groundbreaking” device from Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. This is part of an EU-wide trial. She may be able to recognize signals from her eyes and make words.

A 2mm wide microchip was placed under the retina. Special glasses with a camera were also attached. These were attached to the computer that was worn around her waist.

After normal vision for a long time, her dry age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), caused her to lose one eye.

The computer uses AI algorithms to identify the object that was picked up by its camera.

This is projected through the eye as an infra red beam to the microchip. The microchip converts the signal into an electric signal that’s passed to the brain.

This woman has seven kids and eight grandchildren. It is exciting to be able to return my passions.

“Losing my sight in my left eye due to dry AMD has prevented me from doing what I love like gardening and playing indoor bowls.

“It is a great honor to be first to get this implant. It allows me to enjoy my hobby again. This will make me happy and it will help many other people.

Under the procedure, a 2mm-wide microchip was inserted under the retina and special glasses containing a video camera put on.

The procedure involved inserting a microchip measuring 2 mm in width under the retina. Also special glasses that contained a video camera were put on.

Research is being supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre located at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust as well as the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology.

Pixium Vision, France developed the Prima System device that was used for this operation.

Moorfields Eye Hospital’s consultant vitreoretinal physician Mahi Muqit stated that this device offers hope to patients suffering vision loss due to dry AMD.

He stated, “This revolutionary device gives the possibility of restoring sight to those suffering from dry AMD vision loss.”

“The operation’s success and evidence from the clinical study will be the basis for determining the treatment’s true potential.

Under the procedure, a 2mm-wide microchip was inserted under the retina and special glasses containing a video camera put on

A 2mm wide microchip was placed under the retina. Special glasses with a camera were also put on.

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