At a Friday press conference, the FBI claimed that hostage situations at Texas synagogues last weekend were an ‘act terrorist’ and a hate crime.  

Matthew DeSarno FBI Special Agent In Charge revealed that Malik Faisal Akram’s demands met the definition terrorism.

Akram, an American national, entered Congregation Beth Israel Colleyville on Saturday and took Jewish congregants hostage. 

This is a federal hate crime. As negotiators began to engage with Akram, he repeatedly demanded the United States release a convicted al-Qaida terrorist in exchange for the safe return of the hostages,’ DeSarno said of the 44-year-old Akram.

“His actions were clearly terrorist.” 

DeSarno claimed that the international terror investigation had been ‘immediately launched’ when Akram asked negotiators to release a terrorist in return for his hostages. 

As Akram began to be more aggressive, he was able to negotiate with authorities and issue ‘ultimatums or deadlines’. 

Malik Faisal Akram is pictured at a faith-based outreach center for daytime in Dallas (Texas), January 2, 2022. This image was taken by Reuters on February 18, 2022.

Malik Faisal Akram (pictured), 44, could be heard ranting about American involvement in Afghanistan in calls home as he held hostages in a Texas synagogue

Malik Faisal Akram (pictured), 44, could be heard ranting about American involvement in Afghanistan in calls home as he held hostages in a Texas synagogue

A law enforcement vehicle sits near the Congregation Beth Israel synagogue on January 16, 2022 in Colleyville, Texas

An officer sits in a vehicle of law enforcement near the Congregation Beth Israel synagogue, Colleyville Texas.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Matthew DeSarno, pictured right, revealed that Malik Faisal Akram's demands 'clearly met the definition of terrorism'

Matthew DeSarno FBI Special Agent In Charge, is pictured at right. He revealed that Malik Faisal Akram was demanding ‘clearly the definitions of terror’

DeSarno stated that one hostage had been released by Akram’s FBI hostage negotiators shortly after 5 p.m., while DeSarno said that water and food were being delivered to the hostages during negotiations into the early hours of the morning. 

DeSarno gave the OK to the FBI’s hostage rescue squad to enter the synagogue shortly after 9:00 on Saturday. Akram died as a result of the FBI’s deadly force. 

The Congregation Beth Israel synagogue held four hostages was unharmed. One of the hostages was freed in the midst of the 10 hour standoff, while three other people fled to safety. Akram was then shot. 

MailOnline reported Wednesday that the terrorist from Britain had warned his family, “I have hundreds” in threats to hostages.

Blackburn’s 44-year old son could be heard complaining about American involvement Afghanistan during calls back, as he took hostages at a Texas synagogue.

An FBI SWAT team officer shot him dead shortly after he called home from Lancashire. 

Malik Akram, his father, revealed his distressing telephone calls to friends and family and stated that his son was a jihadist and had also ‘destroyed himself and his families’. 

The Congregation Beth Israel synagogue is shown, January 16, 2022, in Colleyville, Texas

Congregation Beth Israel’s synagogue in Colleyville is displayed, 16 January 2022.

A Texas synagogue hostage flees, watched by a SWAT team officer perched in an armored car

Watching from a SWAT officer in an armored vehicle, a Texas SWAT team officer watches as a hostage escapes from a Texas synagogue.

Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker of Congregation Beth Israel, left, shakes hands with FBI Special Agent DeSarno, during a news conference at Colleyville Center on Friday

Congregation Beth Israel’s Rabbi Charlie Cytron Walker (left) shakes hands during Friday’s news conference held at Colleyville Center.

Speaking in Urdu, his father spoke in Blackburn to express grief.

“It shocked me to hear that he was visiting America from a synagogue.

After his death from Covid-19 last October, the father of six was present at the funeral of his son, Gulzameer. Although they were close for over two years, they had lost touch.

After his death from Covid-19 last October, the father of six was present at the funeral of his son, Gulzameer. Although they were close for over two years, they had lost touch. 

Following six months spent in Pakistan in 2020, MI5 (the UK intelligence service) had investigated his background.

His links to Syria were also evident. It was also claimed that he told his family that Dubai was the first place he visited.

Malik Akram was convicted and once called a menace for his rage about the World Trade Center attack more than twenty years ago.

Blackburn magistrates court issued a rare Exclusion Order to the terror suspect for misusing staff members about the September 11th attack, which claimed over 2,750 lives. 

The terrorist was captured at JFK Airport on January 2, and stayed in the homeless shelter run by the Christian charity. Police now want to piece together his final movements before the attack. 

According to reports, his convictions also included drug deals, violent disorder and driving violations.

Six months imprisonment was served for his 1996 attack on a relative by baseball. A year later, he was released from prison for destruction of property. 

But he was able bypass US strict entry regulations on convicted criminals to arrive in New York City on January 2, staying at a Queens hotel.

Then he went to Dallas, where he spoke about meeting a Mexican bride and stayed in homeless shelters.

According to the FBI, he may have bought a gun from the street and then armed himself when he went into the Colleyville synagogue on Saturday.

Sky News heard from Gulbar his brother, who said that the terrorist suffered from mental illness and that he would not have done it if offered additional help in the UK.

He claimed he traveled over the Atlantic to protest the imprisonment of Aafia, a female terrorist. Siddiqui was infamous for her attempt to kill US troops abroad and earned the nickname Lady Al Qaeda.

Gulbar explained that Gulbar felt strongly about Gulbar’s imprisonment. He feels the injustice of it.