The Matrix Resurrections is the fourth installment, which was long awaited. This film comes 18 years after its last appearance.

But early reviews for the Lana Wachowski directed movie see critics divided, with some panning the film as ‘laughably bad’, while others branded it ‘another truly horrible sequel’.

Further reviews praise the new sci-fi series, and one enthusiastic critic hails it as the’most boldly human sequel to The Last Jedi.

It's back! The long-awaited fourth installment of the Matrix franchise finally returned to screens on Tuesday, with The Matrix Resurrections coming a whopping 18 years after the last offering

It’s back! The eagerly awaited fourth installment in the Matrix franchise was finally released on Tuesday. The Matrix Resurrections will be the first film to air 18 years after its last appearance.

It is the eagerly awaited fourth installment of this sci-fi film franchise.

The film series is made up of four feature films. It begins with The Matrix (1999), then continues with three sequels: The Matrix Reloaded (2003), The Matrix Revolutions (2004) and The Matrix Resurrections (221).

The film focuses on Neo (played by Keanu Reeves), Trinity (played by Carrie Anne Moss) and Morpheus (originally played by Laurence Fishburne, but replaced in The Matrix Resurrections by Yahya AbdulMateen II).

Neo and Trinity once more are trying to rescue humanity from Matrix. This virtual reality system is controlled by artificial intelligence. It imprisons humans and makes them a source of power.

Comeback: The story focuses on the Neo, played by Keanu Reeves, Trinity, played by Carrie-Anne Moss, and Morpheus, originally played by Laurence Fishburne in the first three films, but replaced by actor Yahya Abdul-Mateen II in The Matrix Resurrections

Comeback: The story focuses on the Neo, played by Keanu Reeves, Trinity, played by Carrie-Anne Moss, and Morpheus, originally played by Laurence Fishburne in the first three films, but replaced by actor Yahya Abdul-Mateen II in The Matrix Resurrections 

The Matrix Resurrections is twenty years following the events in The Matrix Revolutions.

Neo returns to his normal life as Thomas A. Anderson, in San Francisco. Then he meets Trinity, a woman whose name he doesn’t recognize.

When a new Morpheus version gives Neo the red pill, Neo’s mind is opened to the Matrix again and he forms a rebel group to battle the enemy.

The fourth film in this sci-fi series features Keanu reprising his role of Neo in The Matrix Revolutions.

Lana Wachowski co-wrote and directed the film. It also features Carrie Ann Moss and Lambert Wilson from the original series.

This movie featured a new cast, which included actress Priyanka Chpra.   

Opinions: But early reviews for the Lana Wachowski directed movie see critics divided, with some panning the film as 'laughably bad', while others branded it 'another truly horrible sequel'

Opinions: But early reviews for the Lana Wachowski directed movie see critics divided, with some panning the film as ‘laughably bad’, while others branded it ‘another truly horrible sequel’

Chopra expressed excitement about being in the film on Instagram recently, posting: “They had me at “Neo” and “Trinity are back!” I was a huge fan of the Matrix trilogy. It was the gold standard… something we all role played and referenced all our lives. So, here I am… a small, excited little fish in the huge cinematic pond that is THE Matrix!’

“Needless, to say, it was an honor and a privilege to be part of the legacy of Lana Wachowski, and have the opportunity to work alongside such an iconic, and legendary, cast. 

Although there has been some mixed reactions to the movie with critics pointing out that it isn’t a perfect film, the overwhelming praise for the set pieces and the chemistry between Carrie-Ann Moss and Keanu Reeves has been unanimous. 

The Times’ Kevin Maher said about the movie: “The curse of The Matrix strikes once again.” This sequel to the era-defining sci fi movie, The Matrix, was produced by Kevin Maher at The Times. It is yet another terrible film from an ingenious and inventive filmmaker. 

The Matrix Revolutions and The Matrix Reloaded (both 2003), were jargon-laden, messy films that squandered every bit of goodwill from the original film, as they tried to make a jokey conclusion.

‘The Matrix Resurrections doesn’t even have the excuse of narrative exigency to hide behind. There is literally no reason for it to exist, a point that is incessantly hammered home by a sophomoric screenplay that mistakes self-referentiality for sophistication and actually includes the line, “Our beloved parent company, Warner Bros, has decided to make a sequel to the trilogy.”’

Verdict: However, further reviews heap praise on the next stage of the sci-fi franchise, with one excited critic hailing it as 'the boldest and most vividly human franchise sequel since The Last Jedi'

Verdict: However, further reviews heap praise on the next stage of the sci-fi franchise, with one excited critic hailing it as ‘the boldest and most vividly human franchise sequel since The Last Jedi’

While Peter Bradshaw from The Guardian adds: ‘Eighteen years after what we thought was the third and final Matrix film, The Matrix Revolutions, Lana Wachowski has directed a fourth: The Matrix Resurrections. But despite some ingenious touches (a very funny name, for example, for a VR coffee shop) the boulder has been rolled back from the tomb to reveal that the franchise’s corpse is sadly still in there. 

‘This is a heavy-footed reboot which doesn’t offer a compelling reason for its existence other than to gouge a fourth income stream from Matrix fans, submissively hooked up for new content, and it doesn’t have anything approaching the breathtaking “bullet time” action sequences that made the original film famous.’ 

However, in a more positive response,  David Ehrlich of IndieWire responded: If “No Way Home” is the snake eating its tail with such reckless abandon that it fools itself into thinking it’s full, “The Matrix Resurrections” is the rare blockbuster that dares to ask what else might be on the menu. 

‘It’s the boldest and most vividly human franchise sequel since “The Last Jedi” (if also messier and more postmodern than Rian Johnson’s miraculous addition to the “Star Wars” canon).’

He stated that it would likely be most divisive. Doubling down on the “Alice in Wonderland” spirit of its franchise, “The Matrix Resurrections” is a movie that will only appeal to fans interested in seeing how deep the rabbit hole goes; anyone simply looking for more “Matrix” isn’t just s**t out of luck, they’re in for an experience that will toy with their expectations for more than two hours without fulfilling a single one of them.’