The number of daily coronavirus infections in Britain rose today for the first-time in more than a week, but death and hospital rates continued to decline.

The Government’s Covid dashboard showed that there had been 42,408 new cases in 24 hours. That is an increase of 14 percent over last week.

Cases had been in freefall since late October — believed to be due to growing immunity in children — except for one blip on November 1, when they rose by around 9 per cent.

Recent hospital data show that 868 Covid patients were admitted to the hospital on November 7. This was almost 14% less than the number the week before. 

A further 195 deaths from coronavirus were reported today, a decrease of 9 per cent compared with the number recorded last Thursday. 

Hospitalisations and deaths — which are both lagging indicators — have been falling for six and three days in a row, respectively.

The country’s biggest symptom-tracking research found that symptoms fell nearly a fifth during the last week, marking the greatest weekly drop in symptoms since summer.

As the government’s new “no jab, not job” policy was in force, care homes throughout England found themselves in chaos.  

Theresa Ingram-Gettins — who runs the Boldmere Court Care Home in Birmingham — broke down as she detailed having to sack six staff members who refused to get vaccinated against Covid.

With 5.83MILLION NHS patients in need for routine operation, the NHS waiting list has reached ANOTHER new record. 

Official data today revealed that 5.83million people are currently waiting on the NHS for routine treatment in England. This is a record number. Hospital bosses have warned that they will be under increasing pressure as winter approaches.

The mammoth figure — which has snowballed since Covid struck — includes 10,000 patients who have spent two years in the queue for elective surgery, such as hip and knee replacements.

Hospitals had to cancel thousands upon thousands of procedures during the worst days of the pandemic in order to accommodate the infected. This left thousands of people with milder illnesses without a choice.

Today, doctors warned that the buildup is ‘concerning’ due to winter pressures and staffing shortages yet not reaching peak levels. They described the health system as being “on its knees”

A poll of NHS bosses found nine in 10 felt the current situation — dealing with the pandemic-induced the backlog and Covid — is ‘unsustainable’ and patient care is being compromised.

Labour criticised the “dangerously long” waiting periods and said that the coming weeks would be some of the most difficult in recent history for the NHS.

You can find it as follows:

  • The Government’s new “no jab no job” policy erupted and threw care homes into turmoil in England.
  • After having to fire six staff members due to No10’s vaccination requirement, one care manager broke down and begged Boris Johnson for a ‘break’.
  • Britain’s most extensive symptom-tracking research found Covid cases declined 18% in their biggest weekly drop of summer since, when 72,000 fell ill daily.
  • According to NHS England, September’s backlog was the largest since 2007 when records were started.
  • The October target of the NHS was three times quicker than ambulance responses, and patients suffering from stroke or heart attacks waited for 55 minutes before they were treated.

Ms Ingram-Gettins said the new policy was ‘affecting people’s mental health’ after it kicked in at midnight, and forced up to 60,000 carers out of work.

According to the care boss, staff in work were being made to work longer hours because of the vacant positions. This was putting a strain on their physical wellbeing. 

She told Good Morning Britain: ‘We’re tired, we’re worn out, we’ve just come through a pandemic — give us a break Boris.’  

Every care home worker in England must have received both their Covid vaccinations. This includes cleaners and receptionists. Boldmere is home to approximately 18,000 residents.

As many as 57,000 staff in care homes failed to submit their jabs by today. Care bosses believe this will cause dangerous levels of staffing that could put residents’ lives at stake. Before the outbreak, there were already 100,000 unemployed workers in this sector.

Unions warn that this new rule is like trying to crack anut with a sledgehammer, as 90 per cent were already vaccinated. Liverpool’s one facility reported that seven percent of their staff had been laid off overnight. 

Nadra Ahmed (chairwoman of the National Care Association) told MailOnline that the sector’s morale was at its lowest point today as there were tens to thousands of vacant positions.

She said, “And there are very real concerns for families that the care homes don’t have enough staff to properly care for their loved ones.” 

It came as a record 5.83million patients are now on NHS waiting lists for routine treatment in England, official data revealed today as hospital bosses warned they are already under ‘unsustainable’ pressure heading into winter.

The mammoth figure — which has snowballed since Covid struck — includes 10,000 patients who have spent two years in the queue for elective surgery, such as hip and knee replacements.

In order to provide for those infected with the virus, hospitals had to cancel thousands upon thousands of procedures. This left thousands of people whose lives were not affected by the outbreak on the brink of collapse.

Doctors warned today that there was concern about the building up of staff absences and winter pressures.

A poll of NHS bosses found nine in 10 felt the current situation — dealing with the pandemic-induced the backlog and Covid — is ‘unsustainable’ and patient care is being compromised.

Labour criticised the “dangerously long” waiting periods and said that the coming weeks would be some of the most difficult in recent history for the NHS.

The NHS waiting list for routine hospital treatment in England has reached 5.83million, official data revealed today marking the eleventh month in a row that the figure has hit a record high. Some 1.6million more Britons were waiting for elective surgery — such as hip and keen operations — at the end of September compared to the start of the pandemic

Official data today revealed that the NHS waiting list in England for routine hospital care has now reached 5.83million. This is the 11th consecutive month of a record-breaking figure. Some 1.6million more Britons were waiting for elective surgery — such as hip and keen operations — at the end of September compared to the start of the pandemic

Despite the total A&E admissions in England being just two per cent more than one month earlier and equal to the number of people who came forward during the same month in 2019, 7,059 patients were forced to wait more than 12 hours to be seen at A&E. The record-high figure is 40 per cent more than the 5,024 forced to wait that long one month earlier. It is also five times bigger than in September 2020 and ten times more than the same month in 2019

Despite the total A&E admissions in England being just two per cent more than one month earlier and equal to the number of people who came forward during the same month in 2019, 7,059 patients were forced to wait more than 12 hours to be seen at A&E. It is 40% higher than the record 5,024 who were forced to wait this long a month before. The record-breaking figure is five times higher than it was in September 2020 and tenfold greater than what happened in the same month of 2019.

The care home’s boss weeps after having to dismiss SIX employees because of No10’s “no jab no job” policy 

Theresa — who runs a home for the elderly in the Midlands — broke down today after being forced to sack six staff members who refused to get vaccinated

Theresa — who runs a home for the elderly in the Midlands — broke down today after being forced to sack six staff members who refused to get vaccinated

A care home manager broke down today after being forced to sack six staff members who refused to get vaccinated against Covid — as she pleaded with Boris Johnson to ‘give us a break’. 

Theresa Ingram-Gettins — who runs the Boldmere Court Care Home in Birmingham —  said it was ‘very difficult’ to have to let staff go, knowing that she is sending some of them ‘into poverty’.

She claimed England’s controversial new ‘no jab, no job’ policy was ‘affecting people’s mental health’ after it kicked in at midnight and forced up to 60,000 carers out of work.

In addition, the boss of care said that employees still employed were having to work overtime to cover for the vacancies. This was impacting their physical well-being. 

She told Good Morning Britain: ‘We’re tired, we’re worn out, we’ve just come through a pandemic — give us a break Boris.’  

Every care home worker in England must have received both their Covid vaccinations. This includes cleaners and receptionists. Boldmere is home to approximately 18,000 residents.

As many as 57,000 staff in care homes failed to submit their jabs by today. Care bosses believe this will cause dangerous levels of staffing that could put residents’ lives at stake. Before the pandemic, 100,000 people were working in the sector.

The unions warned the new rule would be like using a sledgehammer and trying to break a lock, since 90 percent of workers were already immunized. Liverpool’s one facility reported that seven percent of their staff had been laid off overnight. 

Social workers have warned that No10’s controversial “no jabs, no jobs” policy for care home employees will increase pressure on the NHS because it has less capacity to discharge patients from hospitals. 

It is possible that the exact same mandate will be applied to frontline NHS staff from spring. This could lead to a mass exodus just as the NHS emerges from a difficult winter and begins to address the backlog. 

Covid is showing signs of improvement, as hospital and death rates are beginning to decline in line with the cases.

NHS England data shows that September’s backlog has reached its highest level since 2007, when records were first started.

One in twenty Britons are on this list, and the waiting time for treatment is now longer than a year.

For comparison, in September 2019 — before the pandemic hit — just 1,305 patients were forced to wait more than 52 weeks for treatment — less than one per cent of the waiting list.

And A&E data shows 2.1million people turned up for emergency care in October – the most ever. 

But despite the total A&E admissions in England being just two per cent more than one month earlier and equal to the number of people who came forward during the same month in 2019, 7,059 patients were forced to wait more than 12 hours to be seen at A&E.  

The record-high figure is 40 per cent more than the 5,024 forced to wait that long one month earlier.   

This is five times higher than September 2020, and tenfold more than that of the same month in 2019. 

According to the NHS, patients should be seen in four hours. 

In September, almost 370,000 people in England waited more than 6 weeks to receive a crucial diagnostic test.

A total of 369,207 patients were waiting for one of 15 standard tests, including an MRI scan, non-obstetric ultrasound or gastroscopy — used to spot tumours, digestive conditions and other illnesses.

There were 38.182 people in September 2019. Pre-pandemic was 38.802. 

Matthew Taylor, the chief executive officer of the NHS Confederation said that a survey of over 450 health care leaders found nine of 10 saying the current situation is not sustainable and patients are being treated poorly.

According to him, there are still thousands of patients in the hospital for Covid. Although hospitalisations have begun to decline in recent days that is good news, there are still many patients admitted.

“Then there are the usual winter pressures and the enormous amount of demand that was created during the pandemic.

“When you combine these three factors, the result is a situation that almost all leaders in the health system now consider unsustainable.”

If Taylor were to be asked about what “unsustainable” means, Taylor replied that it refers to patient safety, quality, and the ability of hospitals and clinics not being able or willing to take on the enormous amount of elective services backlog. 

Taylor claimed that patients with very advanced conditions are being seen in emergency departments, and added there was a ‘overwhelming’ demand. 

In September, 231,421 urgently diagnosed cancer patients were referred by GPs across England. This is an increase of 15% from September’s 201,013 cases. In September 2019, the equivalent was 195196, which is not a pandemic year. 

Urgent referrals where breast cancer symptoms were present — though not initially suspected — were up from 11,122 in September last year to 12,088 in September 2021. However, the percentage of patients who start treatment for cancer within one month is at its lowest point since 2009 when records were first kept.

The health service’s own standards set out that 96 per cent of people should begin treatment, such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy, within 30 days of the patient and doctor deciding to proceed with it.