CEOs revealed that Woke Generation Z workers are threatening their bosses with a series woke and entitled demands.

Polly Rodriguez (34-year-old CEO at Sex Toy Company Unbound) says she was stunned that her co-founder called her to inform her that a younger social-media manager had called her on Saturday to ask how the vibrator company would be supporting Black Lives Matter. 

The Gen Z’er made the contact in June 2020, just days after George Floyd was killed. Both bosses were surprised by the contact. They assumed that staff members would only be able to reach them on weekends or in an emergency. Unbound hired a diversity, equality and inclusion officer to train staff. It also began a fundraiser to support sex workers of colour.   

Rodriguez commented on the attitude of Gen Z’ers or ‘dot-com kids’, those born between 1997-2021. He told The New York Times that he would not have delegated to his boss when he was entering the workforce. Gen Z doesn’t hesitate to do that…

 ‘Some young former employees are much more willing to burn bridges.

‘To me it’s shortsighted. Is it worth wasting your social clout on social media to get instant gratification, while then trashing someone who could help you professionally? 

Lola Priego (31) was shocked to be given a task by a Gen-Z employer in a note about workplace messaging service Slack.

Priego said she was tickled by her edict and appreciated her underling’s view of her as approachable. However, she admitted that another senior colleague was horrified by the disrespect for the traditional workplace hierarchy. 

By 2025, members of Generation Z will make up 27 percent of the global workforce, predicts the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Polly Rodriguez, 34, CEO of vibrator startup Unbound (pictured) was called by a Gen Z’er on a Saturday demanding to know how firm would support Black Lives Matter

Polly Rodriguez, 34, CEO of vibrator startup Unbound (pictured) was called by a Gen Z’er on a Saturday demanding to know how firm would support Black Lives Matter

Lola Priego, 31, CEO of testing start up Base (pictured), was sent a Slack message by a Gen Z worker giving HER a task to complete

Lola Priego, 31, CEO at testing start-up Base (pictured), was sent a Slack email by a Gen Z worker containing a task for her to complete.

Ali Kriegsman, 30, cofounder of Bulletin, a retail tech company. She still doesn’t know what to do when her employees started asking for paid time off for conditions that her generation would not grin and bear, such as period cramps or anxiety attacks.

She explained that a typical call-in, which is usually sent via text, would read something like this: “Hey, I woken up and I’m not in the best place mentally – I’m going to not come in today.”

Kriegsman admires the effort they make to prioritize their well being, but she also recognizes that giving employees additional PTO could reduce profits. She appreciates their efforts to separate personal and work life, which is difficult in this digital age.

She is like other managers, however, she is caught off guard at the generation’s candid way of speaking up and their disregard for the traditional workplace hierarchy. Despite many bosses being young, millennials, this schism is widespread. 

She told the Times that she wanted to be an entrepreneur and manage my team occasionally because of my period. “But I’m now in a position where it’s necessary to keep going.

Tero Isokauppila, 37 years old, said to the Times that a junior member of his food business encouraged him to post on social media a black square expressing support for the movement. 

Oula, the maternity start-up founded by Oula, recalls a Slack message from one of her youngest employees requesting solidarity with Asian Americans following a series shootings in Atlanta-area spas.

‘You talk to older people and they’re like, “Dude we sell tomato sauce, we don’t sell politics,”‘ said Gabe Kennedy, 30, the founder of herbal supplement company Plant People. Then, you have the younger people saying, “These are political tomato sauce.” This is political tomato sauce.”

Kennedy stated that his millennial 10-person team is accustomed to a rigid work schedule. They often work late and eat Chinese takeout while reading customer feedback. But his youngest employees prefer to create their own schedules. 

 One Gen Zer who interviewed with Kennedy for a full-time position, he said, asked why she needed to clock in got an eight-hour day when she might complete her day’s tasks earlier – Kennedy told her that the role was expected to be a nine-to-five job. 

Kennedy stated to the Times that the older generations were more accustomed to punching the clock. 

'You talk to older people and they’re like, "Dude we sell tomato sauce, we don’t sell politics,"' said Gabe Kennedy, 30, the founder of herbal supplement company Plant People (pictured). 'Then you have younger people being like, "These are political tomatoes. This is political tomato sauce."'

‘You talk to older people and they’re like, “Dude we sell tomato sauce, we don’t sell politics,”‘ said Gabe Kennedy, 30, the founder of herbal supplement company Plant People (pictured). ‘Then, there are younger people who say, “These tomatoes are political.” This is political tomato sauce.”

‘It was, “I climb up the ladder and get my retirement and gold watch.” Then for millennials it was, “There’s still an office but I can play Ping-Pong and drink nitro coffee.”‘

‘For the next generation it’s, “Holy cow I can make a living by posting on social media when I want and how I want.”‘

Many of these young workers are encouraged by the COVID-driven work from home revolution. Multiple corporations have been roiled by staff members who resent being told to return to the office.  

‘These younger generations are cracking the code and they’re like, “Hey guys turns out we don’t have to do it like these old people tell us we have to do it,”‘ Colin Guinn, the 41-year-old co-founder of the robotics company Hangar Technology, told the Times. 

“We can do whatever we want and still be as successful.” We older people are confused and wonder “What is the matter?”   

'These younger generations are cracking the code and they’re like, "Hey guys turns out we don’t have to do it like these old people tell us we have to do it,"' Colin Guinn (pictured), the 41-year-old co-founder of the robotics company Hangar Technology, told the Times.

‘These younger generations are cracking the code and they’re like, “Hey guys turns out we don’t have to do it like these old people tell us we have to do it,”‘ Colin Guinn (pictured), the 41-year-old co-founder of the robotics company Hangar Technology, told the Times.

Ali Kriegsman, 30, co-founder of Bulleting gets texts from her younger staff who say they are too anxious to work. 'As an entrepreneur, I want to call out of managing my team sometimes because my period is making me super hormonal,' she told the Times. 'But I'm in a position where I have to push through'

Ali Kriegsman, 30, is the co-founder of Bulleting. She receives texts from her younger staff members who complain that they are too anxious to work. She told the Times that as an entrepreneur, she wants to be able to leave managing my team because of my period. “But I’m in an area where I have to push on,” she said.

Andy Dunn, founder of the millennial-favored clothing brand Bonobos (pictured), was jolted after a Gen Zer tasked with flagging his in-process book for insensitive language - the woke proofreader left 1,100 comments on the documents in just a day.

Andy Dunn, founder and CEO of Bonobos, a millennial-favorite clothing brand (pictured), was shocked when a Gen Zer was assigned to flag his in-process book’s insensitive language. The woke proofreader left 1,100 comments in just one day.

Andy Dunn, founder and CEO of Bonobos, a millennial-favorite clothing brand, was shocked when a Gen Zer was assigned to flag his in-process book’s insensitive language. The woke proofreader left 1,100 comments in just one day. 

Dunn, 42, stated to the Times that he feels very certain that he is uncool. “I’ve come around to accepting that.”

 Dunn told the times he’s made an effort to step up his sensitivity to gendered language, saying ‘people’ or ‘y’all’ instead of ‘guys.’

According to the Times, ‘I’m like “let’s go y’all”, even though I’m from Illinois,” the entrepreneur stated. 

Dunn was asked his young employees whether they were allowed to take the day off on Juneteenth.