Joe Wicks, Britain’s top-paid online PT has been named the number one on the Forbes list of Britain’s highest-paid fit-fluencers. This is thanks to their massive social media presence. 

Joe Wicks – also known as The Body Coach – earns over £10,000 per Instagram post alone, while the monetisation of popular videos through ad-clicks sees him rake in £7,500 per YouTube clip, according to data from online marketplace OnBuy and Influencer Marketing Hub.

Wicks first rose to prominence during the 2010s as a fitness coach and nutritionist, when he began posting training videos online before releasing his first cookbook, ‘Lean in 15: 15-minute meals’ which became a best-seller in 2015.

Wicks started his PE with Joe campaign in March 2020. It aims to keep kids active at home when they’re locked down. He quickly became the nation’s best-known fitness trainer online and was awarded an MBE. 

Wicks’ current number of Instagram followers stands at 4.2 million – more than double the number he had pre-pandemic – setting the benchmark for fitness influencers.

However, the epidemic has seen celebrities and other athletes rapidly increase their online presence to reap the benefits of the internet health and wellness boom.

The nation's favourite online PT Joe Wicks has topped the list of Britain's most highly-paid fit-fluencers cashing in on their huge social media presence (pictured on ITV 'This Morning' in October 2021)

Joe Wicks, Britain’s top-rated online personal trainer has been named the number one on the list. He is pictured in ITV’s “This Morning”, October 2021.

Wicks embarked on his 'PE with Joe' campaign to help kids remain active from home during lockdown - an initiative which quickly saw him become the country's most famous online fitness coach and earned him an MBE (Wicks pictured filming workouts at the Natural History Museum in August 2021)

Wicks started his campaign ‘PE With Joe’ to keep kids active during lockdown. It was an innovative initiative that quickly led Wicks to become the nation’s best-known online trainer and earned him an MBE. Wicks is pictured in August 2021 filming exercises at the Natural History Museum.

Covid-19 and the subsequent lockdowns have reshaped an industry already in vogue for social media influencers. Their work of promoting products and brands via their millions of followers on the Internet could lead to huge paydays.

The biggest increase in influencers’ content on fitness (or fit-fluencers) was seen when the country was restricted to its homes for many months and citizens began looking for ideas on how they could stay healthy. 

People paid to endorse products by companies are called influencers. Some can be thousands of pounds for a single endorsement.

It can take a whole day to post one Instagram photo with an endorsement. 

Sportspeople also reinforced their social media presence over lockdown to dramatically boost their fanbase and earn healthy paychecks on their posts. Olympian Tom Daley, who has 3.5 million Instagram followers, is thought to make over £8,000 per post

To increase their fans and make healthy incomes, sportspeople have also increased their social media presence beyond lockdown. Olympian Tom Daley, who has 3.5 million Instagram followers, is thought to make over £8,000 per post

Television personalities are also getting in on the action - TV presenter-turned fitness fanatic Davina McCall is believed to rake in over £3,500 for each sponsored post to her 1.4 million Instagram followers.

Television personalities are also getting in on the action – TV presenter-turned fitness fanatic Davina McCall is believed to rake in over £3,500 for each sponsored post to her 1.4 million Instagram followers.

What are Britain’s Top-five Best Paid Fit-fluencers and Why Are They So Great?

These are Britain’s most influential health- and fitness bloggers, according to how much they earn per Instagram post:

  • Joe Wicks: 4.1m followers – £10,139.77 
  • Tom Daley: 3.5m followers – £8,527.68 
  • Lucy Mecklenburgh: 1.7m – £4,214.86 
  • Gemma Atkinson: 1.7m followers – £4,188.33 
  • Davina McCall: 1.4m followers – £3,537.42  

OnBuy/Influencer Market Hub data 

However, it’s not only social media celebrities who have made it big. 

Television personalities and sportspeople have increased their presence on social media to increase their fans and make a healthy income. 

Olympian Tom Daley, who has 3.5 million Instagram followers, is thought to make over £8,000 per post, while long-time television presenter-turned fitness fanatic Davina McCall is believed to rake in over £3,500 for each sponsored post to her 1.4 million Instagram followers. 

A new online tool, launched this year by the Internet Association of Financial Professionals (IoT), can be used to calculate the cash payout for accounts with different popularity on various platforms.

The ‘social salary calculator’, created by music licensing platform Lickd.co, works out a level of social media engagement that would earn you your ideal salary.

For example, if your desired yearly salary is £50,000, you’ll need a minimum of 1,000 YouTube subscribers and 16.6 million yearly views on your videos.

Alternatively, on Instagram, you’ll need a minimum of 5,000 followers and 214  sponsored posts a year on the platform to earn the desired £50,000. 

It's estimated that you need at least 5,000 followers before you can start to actually make any money from Instagram (Stock image)

You need to have at least 5,000 Instagram followers in order for you to make money with Instagram. (Stock photo)

Or you could earn £50,000 a year from having at least 10,000 TikTok subscribers and 187.6 million TikTok video views a year. 

Lickd.co explains that Influencers are rapidly increasing in popularity and are the highest paid. It’s not surprising then, that so many people look to leave their jobs, says Lickd.co.

‘So when it comes to the cold, hard numbers, how many followers, views, and posts would you need to make the wage that you’re currently earning? 

‘Using various industry estimates, we’ve created the following calculators so you can work out just that.’