A couple of Lego aficionados have now completed a 21-foot-long replica of Old London Bridge after working on it for four weeks, sometimes putting in 14 hours a day.

The stunning creation, their 27th project, sits proudly in the sitting room of Mike Addis, 63, and Catherine Weightman, 58 from Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire.

Three-foot high, the replica of the bridge that crossed the Thames between 1209 and 1831 was created using 400,000 Lego bricks.

Mike Addis, 63, and Catherine Weightman, 58, pictured, proudly demonstrate their latest project, a 21-foot-long replica of Old London Bridge

Mike Addis, 63, and Catherine Weightman, 58, pictured, proudly demonstrate their latest project, a 21-foot-long replica of Old London Bridge

The coupe's replica of the bridge was made using 400,000 Lego bricks and stands at three-foot-tall in the middle of their living room

This replica bridge, which was created using 400,000 Lego bricks by the coupe, stands 3 feet high in their living area.

Mr Addis and Ms Weightman’s recreation of the bridge also includes 78 houses, 500 mini-figures, a castle and chapel.

Other features include security guards who patrol the bridge’s pay toll, bakers, and residents. 

This only encompasses three-quarters the entire bridge span. It wouldn’t be possible to fit the whole size in the house.

The Old London Bridge replica has a number of characters with the structure including a castle and a chapel

Replica of the Old London Bridge has many characters, including a castle or a chapel.

There are little figures of guards patrolling the pay toll of the bridge as well as other characters who are bakers, merchants and residents

The bridge has little guards who watch the payment toll. There’s also a few merchants and bakers on the other side.

Frost Fair festivities reimagined through Lego. The replica comes with 78 houses and 500 mini-figures

Frost Fair celebrations reimagined using Lego It includes 500 mini-figures and 78 houses.

Frost Fairs were used as inspiration for the model. They were held at the time that the Thames had frozen in the 16th Century. 

Professor of economics, Mr Addis stated that this model is probably the least practical because it passes right through central space.

It splits the space in half – you can walk around the living area from one side to the other by leaving a gap of about four feet.

“We held a party last night with people from one side and others on the other.

The festive replica was inspired by Frost Fairs which were held when the Thames froze over from the 16th century

Frost Fairs were the inspiration for this festive reproduction. They were held at the time that the Thames had frozen in the 16th Century.

“Most people are amazed by its size.

Mr Addis is now planning to fit himself, Ms Weightman and 12 family members – including young children – around the carefully constructed model for Christmas.

He said, “We have the settees one side and the heaters the other.”

“We provide separate Lego sets for children to use.”

To research for the replica, the couple visited an existing wooden model of the bridge in St Magnus The Martyr Church, London.

A Lego figure crosses the bridge in the replica. The model only includes three quarters of the bridge's entire span, as the full size wouldn't fit in the house

The replica features a Lego Lego character crossing the bridge. As the replica doesn’t have the complete span of bridge, it only covers three quarters.

The Old London Bridge is more famous than the London Bridge that crosses the river.

The busy crossroads were lined with shops, houses and other businesses. In the 1580s, Queen Elizabeth I built water mills. 

According to Mr Addis, “Everything is made individually and each house is unique.”

MrAddis and Ms Weightman, pictured, worked on the project for four weeks, sometimes putting in 14 hours a day

MrAddis, Ms Weightman (pictured), worked for the project for 4 weeks. Sometimes, they put in up to 14 hours per day.

“Some days were 14-hour work weeks to accomplish this task.

You must have patience You might find some of the tasks quite challenging. We had to use half bricks in order to make the arches.

The model will continue to be displayed until January 6th, when it will traditionally be removed.

Their love of Lego was sparked in childhood. However, their passion for Lego was rekindled when their child visited a friend and the couple retrieved Lego from their attic to give him a chance to play.

Old London Bridge, pictured in a file image. Shops and houses lined either side of the busy crossing, and in the 1580s Queen Elizabeth I even installed water mills

Old London Bridge as a file photo The busy cross was lined with shops, houses and other businesses. In the 1580s, Queen Elizabeth I built water mills.

One of the couple's previous Christmas Lego creations. Pictured, a model of Cambridgeshire's Ely Cathedral

A previous Christmas Lego creation by the couple. Photo: A model of Cambridgeshire’s Ely Cathedral

Mr Addis said that Lego was a great love. It’s something we do with friends often – a friend visited us one weekend to teach us. 

A large polar bear was previously constructed by the couple.

The bricks are repurposed each time and placed in appropriate colour and size categories for deconstruction. 

WHAT WERE THE FROST FAIRS?

Frost Fairs were held on the River Thames when the river freezes. They could remain iced for as long as two months. This tradition is believed to have been started in the 1600s.

Some Londoners took this opportunity to revel in the cold weather by visiting bars, restaurants, and shops offering fruits and roasted meats.

The ice was so thick by January, that shopkeepers were able to make fires inside their tents to stay warm. 

Frost Fairs on the River Thames happened when the water froze over in a tradition thought to have begun in the 1600s

Frost Fairs were held on the River Thames when the river freezes, a tradition that began in the 1600s

Seven major fairs were held between 1607 and 1814. There may also have been many more.   

Although the weather had begun to heat up too quickly to allow fairs to go on by 1800, there were still many celebrations that took place along the frozen river.

According to some records, there was even a parading elephant in one year.

 Source: Historic UK