Get ready for snow: The Met Office has announced that the Arctic blast will deliver snow showers to the UK this week. This is after Brits were forced to endure the coldest night of 2012, when temperatures plummeted to -7.9C.

  • The Met Office has warned of a ‘severe frost’ and icy conditions today as a deep freeze settles across England 
  • Forecasters have predicted snowfall in some parts of England’s northeast over the coming weeks.
  • According to them, snow could begin falling in the north of Scotland by next week. Snow will then reach England in February. 

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After temperatures dropped to -7.9C (Ordinary) last night, forecasters warned that Britain could be in for snow soon.

The Met Office has warned of a ‘severe frost’ and icy conditions today as a deep freeze settles across large parts of England and Wales.

The weather service predicts that snow will fall in some parts of England’s northeast over the next week.

Clare Nasir, a forecaster said that there will be Arctic air flowing down from the North delivering snow showers to the Northeast. 

According to the Met Office, snow could begin falling in Northern Scotland by next week and reach England by February 1.

UK Health and Security Agency alerts people living in southern and central England about vulnerable neighbours who may be affected by the large freeze.  

Forecasters warn that Britain will be hit by snow in the coming weeks after it dropped to -7.9C last night.

Despite the cold weather, most of Britain is expected to be dry and grey tonight, before moving on to wetter weather in the Northwest tomorrow. Pictured: Swans on the River Avon at Harnham, Salisbury, yesterday

Even with the freezing weather, the majority of Britain will be grey and dry tonight before we move on to warmer weather tomorrow in the Northwest. Pictured: Swans on the River Avon at Harnham, Salisbury, yesterday

The Met Office has warned of a ‘severe frost’ and icy conditions today as a deep freeze settles across large parts of England and Wales

The Met Office has warned of a ‘severe frost’ and icy conditions today as a deep freeze settles across large parts of England and Wales

The mercury dropped to minus 7.9C in Oxfordshire last night. Pictured: A horse grazes in a frosty field at sunrise in Dunsden, Oxfordshire, yesterday

Last night, the mercury fell to minus 7.9C. Pictured: A horse grazes in a frosty field at sunrise in Dunsden, Oxfordshire, yesterday

Snow could hit the northeast of England within weeks. Pictured: Waves pound the pier and lighthouse Seaham Harbour in County Durham yesterday

Within weeks, snow could be in the Northeast of England. Pictured yesterday: The waves battered the lighthouse Seaham Harbour, County Durham.

Walkers out by the woods on a bitterly cold morning in the countryside in  Dunsden, Oxfordshire

Salisbury Cathedral from across the Harnham Water Meadows

Left: Walkers out by the woods on a bitterly cold morning in the countryside in Dunsden, Oxfordshire. Right: Salisbury Cathedral from across the Harnham Water Meadows

Even with the freezing weather, Britain’s majority will remain dry and gray tonight. Tomorrow, wetter conditions are expected in the Northwest.

According to The Met Office: “Cloudy and windy north with more rain or drizzle in hills. It is usually cloudy and dry elsewhere but can occasionally be sunny.

The low temperatures are expected to continue into next week. Patchy fog and frost will be falling in some parts of the country on Tuesday morning.

According to the Met Office, it was “Elsewhere” with rain and sometimes mild.  

A walker out with their dog by the woods on a cold morning in Dunsden, Oxfordshire today

Walking with their dog in the woods today, a couple from Dunsden.

A horse grazing in a frosty field at sunrise this morning in Dunsden, Oxfordshire ahead of a big freeze

This morning, before the first big freeze in Oxfordshire, a horse was seen walking in frosty fields in Dunsden.

The Met Office forecasted snowfall towards the beginning of February in its long-range prediction.

From January 31 to February 14, it warns that ‘some colder interludes remain possible, bringing a risk of occasional snow, this most likely over northern hills’.

‘This period is likely to see a gradual transition to more unsettled conditions,’ the Met Office said.

‘Heaviest precipitation is likely to occur across the northwest, particularly later in the period, whilst drier than average conditions are more likely to prevail in the southeast, particularly earlier in the period.

‘Spells of strong winds are likely, mainly in the north.

‘Temperatures likely to be slightly above average overall. Some colder interludes are still expected though, bringing a risk of occasional snow, most likely over northern hills.’ 

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