Sheffield streets saved by people power with connections to Empire: The city defiant that won’t wake up

  • Sheffield street names under attack by woke campaigners, will be preserved
  • Canning Street was named after George Canning who opposed the freeing of slaves 
  • Gladstone Road was named after William Gladstone. Gladstone’s father was slave-owner.
  • When residents were asked about their opinions, they said that they didn’t want any changes. 










Street Names that have been deemed unacceptable by woke campaigners are to be retained because the residents don’t want them changed.

Experts claimed that Sheffield was home to a number of streets linked with people who were ‘involved n slavery’ or ‘violent suppression’.

Canning Street was named in honor of George Canning (ex-prime minister) who opposed the freeing of slaves. 

Street names which came under fire by woke campaigners will be kept because residents do not want them changed. Gladstone Road (pictured below) was named in honor of ex-PM William Gladstone

Gladstone Road was named in honor of ex-PM William Gladstone. 

He called slavery – which was outlawed in 1834 – the ‘foulest crime’ in UK history, but in his younger days he supported compensation for slave owners.

His grandfather was one of the largest slave-owners in British Empire. 

Peel Street was founded in the memory of Sir Robert Peel (another ex-PM), founder of today’s police force. His father opposed slavery fearing that it might harm the cotton industry. 

Cannon Hall Road and other city streets are also named after Cannon Hall Road. This street was named after the stately home where its owner was involved in slavery. 

The slave-ship’s owner, however, used his name for the mansion. However the property was eventually owned by an antislavery activist.

William Gladstone (pictured) called slavery – which was outlawed in 1834 – the 'foulest crime' in UK history, but in his younger days he supported compensation for slave owners

William Gladstone (pictured) called slavery – which was outlawed in 1834 – the ‘foulest crime’ in UK history, but in his younger days he supported compensation for slave owners

The Race Equality Commission of Sheffield presented this year a report that claimed certain aspects of Sheffield’s geography perpetuated racist, obsolete and uncomfortable messages.

It was found that 100 monuments had been dedicated exclusively to whites, according to the report. The report also found that the only depictions of white people in the city were ‘likely to be stereotypical and negative, like a head carved with a tunic. 

Just one plaque issued under the Sheffield Legends scheme honouring celebrities was dedicated to someone with an ethnically diverse background – Olympian Dame Jessica Ennis-Hill.

In a consultation residents were asked their opinion but indicated that they didn’t want any changes. 

According to a spokesperson for the council, “We recognize this strong feeling” and do not plan on changing street names or removing statues. 

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