Butterkist Popcorn has a bitter taste, as giant billboards are placed by marketers just feet from the Cenotaph

  • After the Whitehall stunt, social media users were furious at the popcorn producers
  • Users on Twitter criticized the brand’s’shameless’ placement of the massive advert.
  • For the most recent campaign, the van featured the slogan “Here for the Drama” on the side.
  • It stopped at the Cenotaph, where drivers served samples to an audience.










Butterkist was cited for leaving an advertisement van at the Cenotaph, central London.

After Friday’s Whitehall incident, social media was flooded with angry comments from popcorn producers.

Twitter users blasted the brand for ‘shamelessly’ plonking the huge billboard by the iconic war memorial.

The van was spotted driving through Westminster with the phrase ‘here for the drama’ emblazoned on its side as part of a Butterkist advertising blitz.

But it stopped in front of the Cenotaph as drivers – wearing theatre-style holders – dished out samples to a small crowd.

The popcorn makers incensed social media viewers after the stunt on Whitehall on Friday morning

The popcorn makers incensed social media viewers after the stunt on Whitehall on Friday morning

Twitter users blasted the brand for 'shamelessly' plonking the huge billboard by the iconic war memorial. It is pictured driving through Westminster

On Twitter, users condemned the brand’s blatant use of the billboard near the historic war memorial. You can see it driving through Westminster

Cenotaph: The Cenotaph is an empty grave for fallen soldiers

It stands 50ft high and is located on Whitehall’s ground floor since the First World War. The Cenotaph is not meant to serve as an epicentre for a nation’s sorrow, but was intended as scenery.

Following the 1919 conclusion of The Treaty of Versailles, all Allied nations agreed that there would be a series of ‘peace marches’. David Lloyd George was struck at the sight of troops in Paris saluting a symbolic catafalque. This is the platform to place a coffin. A ‘prominent painter’ was asked to create something like it.

Celebrated architect Edwin Lutyens came up with a ‘cenotaph’ – from the Greek word for an ’empty tomb’ – on top of a pillar or ‘pylon’ that would serve as a saluting point for the 16,500 servicemen who would march by it. Lutyens designed it quickly using wood, plaster, and canvas. It was unveiled so fast that no one was invited to the parade.

On the following day, a totally unexpected event occurred. The next day, the unexpected happened. Soon after the soldiers had left the scene, the grieving family rushed to add their sorrow to the sight.

Then they began to plant flowers all around the base. Within a matter of minutes, the flowers were already 10 feet high. One boy was unable to contain his sadness and said, “Oh Mummy! What a beautiful garden my Daddy has!” This was immediately resented as a permanent tribute. Lloyd George didn’t need any convincing. 

The stunt was criticized by social media users who were furious and called the brand’shameless’.

One man posted: ‘I saw you trampling all over the Cenotaph like it is somewhere to hang your coat you shameless p****.’

Another stated, “No respect.” It doesn’t surprise me at all. One woman stated: “Seriously? It is imperative that you move this.

Another said, “Imagine that you think this is a nice look.” Another Twitter user wrote: “Please move this van.”

One more: Butterkist popcorn tries to make a buck off the drama in Westminster, by setting up stall at Downing Street.

Cenotaph is 50ft high and was placed on Whitehall at the close of the First World War.

This was not intended to be the epicenter of nation’s grieve, but rather as scenery.

The Treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919. All Allied countries agreed to have ‘peace marches’.

David Lloyd George was struck by the sight troops in Paris saluting the catafalque (the platform for a coffin), which is symbolic.

He requested that a “prominent artist” produce something similar.

Celebrated architect Edwin Lutyens came up with a ‘cenotaph’ – from the Greek word for an ’empty tomb’ – on top of a pillar or ‘pylon’ that would serve as a saluting point for the 16,500 servicemen who would march by it.

Lutyens’s design, made from plaster, wood and canvas was quickly constructed. It was unveiled on the day of the parade with so little fuss that even he wasn’t invited.

Unexpected phenomena occurred the next day.

As soon as the troops were gone, the grieving families ran to their homes to express their sorrow and to imagine that it would contain the spirit or the fallen.

Then they began to plant flowers all around the base. They were soon 10ft in depth. One boy in the crowd cried out, “Oh Mummy! What a beautiful garden my Dad has!”

Social media users were left fuming with the stunt and slammed the brand for acting 'shamelessly'

Users of social media were furious at the stunt, and they criticized the brand for being’shamelessly.

The Cenotaph stands at 50ft and has been on Whitehall since the end of the First World War. Pictured: Huge crowds turned up to see King George V unveil the memorial at 11am on Armistice Day, 1920

Cenotaph is 50ft tall and has stood on Whitehall ever since the First World War. Pictured: A huge crowd gathered at King George V’s unveiling of the memorial, 11am Armistice Day in 1920.

It was immediately demanded that this be made a permanent tribute. Lloyd George didn’t need any convincing.

Lutyens was given the task by his government of rebuilding his unfinished tomb to ensure that he would live forever in Portland stone.

He intentionally omitted any religious symbolism. 

Even more people gathered at the unveiling of King George V’s memorial on Armistice Day in 1920 by a large crowd.

This would then be followed at Westminster Abbey by the funeral service for the unidentified warrior.

One year later, the Royal British Legion was established and hosted its first Poppy Appeal – this set the standard for national remembrance.

Butterkist was contacted for comment.

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