A retired school inspector aged 81 was killed and another injured when she used the accelerator rather than brake to move her auto.

  • Judith Pearson was seriously hurt while driving her car and killed a neighbour.
  • The then-81-year old retired inspector of Ofsted stepped onto the accelerator and not on the brakes 
  • Her car was driven into Martin Bust, a cancer sufferer, and Albert Attfield (granddad). 
  • Pearson wept when she received a 10-month sentence suspended for an additional 18-month period










According to court hearings, one of two neighbours died and the other was seriously injured when a retired inspector from Ofsted stepped on her accelerator rather than the brake as she drove her auto car. 

Judith Pearson, then 81, intended to reverse her car into her driveway in Coleorton, near Coalville in November last year when she ploughed into cancer-sufferer Martin Bust and grandfather Albert Attfield.

Attfield (79) was cleaning leaves, talking with his wife and Mr Bust when he was hit by Pearson. He was left with multiple fractures and died in hospital with chest injuries and pneumonia.

His neighbour Mr Bust was thrown across the road by the force of the impact and left with serious leg injuries. 

Pearson wept in the dock as she was given a 10 month jail sentence, suspended for 18 months, banned from driving for two years and ordered to pay £500 costs. Soon after, Pearson surrendered to the DVLA her driving permit and declared that she does not intend on driving again.

Judge Ebrahim Mouncey sentencing said that the case demonstrates how powerful motor cars really are. He also stated, “Even at modest speeds, cars have immense power.” 

Judith Pearson, then 81, intended to reverse her car into her driveway in Coleorton, near Coalville in November last year when she ploughed into cancer-sufferer Martin Bust and grandfather Albert Attfield

Judith Pearson (81 at the time) wanted to pull her car into her Coleorton driveway near Coalville. She did this in November 2013. This was when her grandfather Albert Attfield and Martin Bust were both diagnosed with cancer.

The judge stated that Pearson had clearly shown remorse and that Pearson would need to accept the truth of her actions. He would also have to deal with it knowing full well what he was doing.

At Leicester Crown Court, Mr Attfield was described as a ‘well liked, respected, generous and compassionate’ man, whose family and his wife Margaret have been left ‘devastated’ by his death. 

Sarah Riley, Sarah’s daughter, added that her dad was much loved as a fit and healthy man with many more years ahead. 

Bust was able to have surgery on his leg, where he received metal plates. He also had cancer treatment. According to the court, Bust is currently receiving therapy to teach him how to walk again but has fears about his ability to get back to normal mobility. 

Prosecuting, Jonathan Dunne said the Crown accepted the defendant did not deliberately drive in that manner.

Pearson wept in the dock as she was given a 10 month jail sentence, suspended for 18 months, banned from driving for two years and ordered to pay £500 costs

Pearson wept in the dock as she was given a 10 month jail sentence, suspended for 18 months, banned from driving for two years and ordered to pay £500 costs 

Kevin Waddingham, mitigating said Pearson was previously a teacher. Then he became a Head Teacher and an Ofsted Inspector before retiring after a distinguished career.

His explanation was that she had been performing routine moves and panic overtook her ability to control the situation.

“She couldn’t explain the events.”

His shock and distress were acute. He said that his first thoughts were for the people who have been hurt emotionally and physically by her actions. She is distraught and wants to show her regret. 

“It’s what she remembers first when she wakes up and last when she goes to bed. 

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