Roscosmos Russia, the Russian space agency has threatened to file charges against a NASA astronaut it says drilled a hole of two millimeters in a Soyuz MS-09 rocket that docked with 2018’s International Space Station (ISS).

The agency recently completed its investigation into what it deems was a sabotage, citing Serena Auñón-Chancellor, a crew member of the ISS at the time of the incident, as the culprit.

Roscosmos has announced the possibility of criminal prosecutions after Russian law enforcement received the allegations.

The Izvestia newspaper reported on Friday, citing sources, that Auñón-Chancellor made the hole with the hopes of return home early, TASS reports.

Sources told the Russian news outlet that Auñón-Chancellor wanted to leave the orbiting laboratory due to a blood clot or fight wither her boyfriend onboard the ISS.

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Roscosmos Russia, the Russian space agency has threatened to file charges against a NASA astronaut it says drilled a hole of two millimeters in a Soyuz MS-09 rocket that docked with International Space Station (ISS).

DailyMail.com reached out to NASA to obtain more information, but has not received a reply.

Roscosmos insiders claimed that multiple holes were drilled in the low gravity by someone who was not familiar with the design of the module.

After an air leak caused a drop in pressure, the hole was discovered on August 30, 2018.

Russian astronauts quickly filled the gap and restored pressure by using epoxy resin, a glue-like substance. 

The agency recently completed its investigation into what it deems was a sabotage, citing Serena Auñón-Chancellor, a crew member of the ISS at the time of the incident, as the culprit

The agency recently completed its investigation into what it deems was a sabotage, citing Serena Auñón-Chancellor, a crew member of the ISS at the time of the incident, as the culprit

The allegations have been handed over to Russian law enforcement, allowing Roscosmos to announce the possibility of criminal charges. The hole was spotted on August 30, 2018, after a pressure drop was identified due to an air leak

Roscosmos announced that criminal charges could be brought against Roscosmos. After a leaky air pipe caused by a pressure drop, the hole was discovered on August 30, 2018.

The hole had been sealed, and cosmonauts used an endoscope to take photos and videos of it.

According to a Russian official, the hole could have been created deliberately by someone below.

Russia opened an investigation into what caused the hole in 2019 and shared allegations in Augusts that Auñón-Chancellor made the hole.

NASA replied by saying that it doesn’t comment on medical issues but denied the claim. They described the astronaut as highly respected and valued, as well as describing his many valuable contributions.

Bill Nelson, NASA’s head posted in August on Twitter: “I completely support Serena.”

However, the latest development now opens the door for Russia’s Roscosmos to press charges against Auñón-Chancellor.

NASA stated that astronauts aboard the space station were not in danger due to the “lifeboat” spacecraft, which was attached to it to allow for a return trip to Earth.

Russian cosmonauts quickly plugged the hole and restored pressure, patching it up with several layers of epoxy resin - a glue-like substance

Russian astronauts quickly filled the gap and restored pressure by using epoxy resin, a glue-like substance.

Further investigation and images later confirmed that the hole had been created from the inside. This ruled out the possibility of any space debris.

Sergey Prokopyev and two other astronauts, Auñón-Chancellor of NASA and Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, were on board when it as detected.

The allegation against Auñón-Chancellor was made in an article published by TASS claiming to ‘debunk’ 12 things America claims about the Russian space agency.

According to them, it was impossible for any damage to occur on Earth because the ship wouldn’t have passed the necessary vacuum chamber tests.

“If it had any cracks in it, the pressure inside it would instantly drop and it wouldn’t pass the necessary tests.” Roscosmos therefore immediately ruled out any damage to Soyuz-MS-09, as reported by TASS.

It then goes on to discuss the mental health of Auñón-Chancellor, suggesting she took drastic action to ‘speed up her return to Earth’.

This list explains the reason for the claim of defamation. The video camera that was at the intersection of American and Russian segments “mysteriously” stopped working, and it also suggests that US astronauts declined to undergo a polygraph.

Roscosmos employees told TASS they had performed a polygraph on Russian astronauts. However, the agency was not permitted to look at the instruments and drills aboard the ISS looking for metal shavings.

He continued to say that out of eight holes, only one made it through. The rest seemed to merely scratch the walls.

What could have caused a hole in the ISS?

Theory One – This was the result of a meteorite.

The tiny hole in the Russian space capsule was found locked to ISS at 30 August.

The ‘micro fracture’ believed to be around 2mm wide in the $150 billion (£115 billion) space station was discovered after astronauts noticed a drop in pressure.

Alexander Gerst, an astronaut from the European Space Agency, reportedly rubbed his fingers on the hole and crew then patched it up with tape.

After cabin pressure had returned to normal, the hole was confirmed as repaired on Friday, 31 August.

Initial theories suggested that it was caused by small meteorites. Astronauts sealed the leak with tape after there had been a slight loss in pressure. 

Theory 2 – It was created deliberately in orbit

However, it became apparent that the hole had been created by an insider, and not someone outside. This was either from Earth or space, according to the Russian space agency. 

Roscosmos’ chief Dmitry Rogozin claimed in September, that the hole may have been made during manufacturing or in orbit while the hand was ‘wavering’.

Although he didn’t mention whether he suspects any US crew members, the statement caused some confusion.

According to sources, the issue of fixing the hole could have caused tension between Moscow and Houston.

Rogozin, who had said that the media had misunderstood his words, has now retracted his claim and admitted that he never pointed the finger at U.S. spacecraft astronauts.

The third theory – It was created by a worker from Energia

A leading theory from an unnamed source at Energia said the hole was made on the ground – potentially caused by ‘deliberate interference’ – with suggestions the person responsible may have already been identified.

According to another anonymous source, the hole was made by a worker. He covered his mistake with a sealing device instead of reporting.

Unnamed sources at Energia said to RIA Novosti, a Russian news agency, that the company had ‘a good reputation for providing reliable information.[t]The hole was dug on the ground.”

Source:[t]”The person responsible for this act of negligence was identified”

An anonymous source claimed that the hole wasn’t intentionally made, but was hid by an employee who covered it with a seal rather than reporting.

Although the patchwork was repaired for the entire trip to the ISS, it began to fall apart after just three weeks.